Why Web Developers, Meet the CMS?


A CMS or a ‘Content Management System’ quite literally allows you to control and manage the content within your web site – without technical training. Using this uncomplicated system you can very easily add, delete images and edit text in your web site on the fly. You can also have an unlimited number of pages and a full site-search engine.

No experience Required:

You need have no programming or HTML experience, when we using the CMS. Simply put, if you have just a little experience with Microsoft Word then you will be able to manage the content of your own web site very easily indeed. Editing can be done with any normal web browser from anywhere in the world – or with your mobile device.

 Why use CMS ?

There are several possible reasons for using a Content Management System, but the main reason for using a CMS is to make creating and editing of content simple and easy. Often developers forget that this is the main purpose of a CMS and in search of more and more functionality. Content doesn’t just include text however. Sometimes the content you need on a site is a contact form or user authentication system. The trick is to find the CMS that provides the functionality without sacrificing ease of use for yourself or, depending on the situation, your customer. A good CMS will allow you to spend more time focused on the design of the frontend then on implementing extensions or functionality.

Key reasons to use a CMS include:

  • Client wants control over content creation and publishing, including uploading of images and files, and user
  • Client wants public and private (registered user) sections of a Web site.
  • Client wants visitors to be able to interact with the content.
  • Client wants rotating, blog style content display – for example, front page article summaries with ‘read more’ links.
  • You, or client manager, want integrated Web administration control of site.

Best Content Management Systems for Designers

vThe most popular content management systems—WordPress, Drupal and Joomla!—employ an open-source development model. You can download and use the software at no cost, but more importantly, an open-source license gives developers the freedom to modify and redistribute the code. The “Big Three” have thus spawned large communities of programmers who make improvements and create add-ons that build on the software’s core capabilities. These communities are part of larger ecosystems that include extensive training resources such as books, videos and conferences. And because they are so popular, it’s relatively easy to find developers and administrators familiar with the tools.

As an alternative, numerous companies offer proprietary content management systems that you pay for. Some are downloadable packages that you must configure for use on a server, whereas others are hosted online services. The downside isn’t necessarily the cost, though you certainly have to factor that in. The main issue is that these programs lack user or developer communities that match the “Big Three” in terms of size or scope. Instead, the vendors point to advantages such as ease of use, better features or integrated design tools.